Featured Postcards: New Orleans, Osceola, Jackson, Tri-Cities and Wolf Point .

.

SUPPORT THIS PROJECT--Over 7,600 photos of Philadelphia, Albuquerque, Allentown, Atlanta, Atlantic City, Austin, Baltimore, Battle Mountain, Bellows Falls, Bensalem Township, Berkeley, Bethlehem, Bolivar, Boston, Bordentown, Boulder, Brooklawn (NJ), Buffalo, Burlington (NJ), Cambridge, Camden, Carbondale, Carmel, Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Cherry Hill, Chester, Cheyenne, Chicago, Claymont (DE), Cleveland, Collingswood (NJ), Columbus, Daly City, Denver, Detroit, El Cerrito, El Paso, Emeryville, Ewing Township (NJ), Freemont, Gary, Glassboro, Glenside (PA), Gloucester, Haddonfield (NJ), Harpers Ferry, Harrisburg, Hoboken, Houston, Jackson, Jersey City, Joliet, Kansas City (KS), Kansas City (MO), Kennewick, Knoxville, Lancaster, Langhorne, Laurel Springs (NJ), Levittown (PA), Lindenwold (NJ), Los Angeles, Marcus Hook, Media (PA), Milpitas, Minneapolis, New Orleans, McCook, New York, Newark, New Harmony, Normal, Norristown, North Charleston, Oakland, Omaha, Orlando, Osceola, Overland Park, Palmyra (NJ), Pasco, Penndel, Pittsburgh, Portland, Providence, Raleigh, Redwood City, Reno, Richmond, Richmond (CA), Riverside (NJ), Rutland, Sacramento, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Bruno, San Francisco, San Jose, San Leandro, Santa Cruz, Santa Monica, San Xavier del Bac, Sausalito, Savannah, Scranton, Somerdale (NJ), South San Francisco, Springfield (IL), St. Louis, St. Paul, Steelton, Stratford (NJ), Taylor (PA), Trenton, Tucson, Union City (NJ), Ventnor, Vineland, Washington, West New York, Westmont (NJ), Wichita, Williston, Wilmington, Wolf Point, Woodbury (NJ) and Youngstown, etc.

Saturday, January 12, 2013

World War in Asia?

As published at OpEd News, Dissident Voice, Counter Currents, CounterPunch, Greanville Post, Information Clearing House, Hamsayeh.net and Signs of the Times, 1/12/13:





With the Asia Pivot, the US wants to encircle China, and supplies old and new allies with missiles aimed at its main rival. An amped up arms race means cash flow for the world's biggest death dealer. If all these Asian nations buy as many American fighter planes as Taiwan, US armament workers can knock down a few more Bud Lites, and take their wives and kiddies to Ruby Tuesday twice a week even.

So far, Japan is going along with this plan. The Sensaku/Diaoyu Islands dispute was dormant until stirred up recently by Tokyo. As tension heated up, the US then shipped missiles to Japan, with the lame explanation that they were meant to deter North Korea. Newly elected Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe lost no time declaring that Japan will increase defense spending, that China is “wrong” in this dispute and there’s nothing to negotiate. By contrast, Abe said he could sit down with South Korea over another sea breeze stare down, since “both nations share liberal and democratic values, and have respect for basic human rights and the rule of law,” unlike China, that is.

Such a verbal reverse kick won’t soon be forgotten, especially from an adversary whose meat and bone crimes are still fresh. Three quarters of a century ain’t ish in Asia. The chiefs of Honda, Toyota, Mitsubishi, Sony and Sanyo, etc., must be gagging at Abe’s posturing, for it’s never wise to give your best customer the finger, and over what, a few symbolic rocks, with a fistful of tuna thrown in, wasabi not included? It’s understandable that Japan is reluctant to yield its primacy in Asia to China, but these provocations surely won’t reverse the tide, only yield dire consequences.

A chunkier China is certainly something to dread, as it has already knocked aside its first victims, the Southeast Asian flyweights bordering the South China Sea, or what is called “the East Sea” by Vietnamese. This oil rich and strategically important territory has been claimed entirely by China, including islands just off the Vietnamese coast, explored, mapped and exploited by the Nguyen Dynasty since the 17th Century. By contrast, the official Chinese map from 1904 still showed Hainan, much further North, as China’s southernmost point. Whatever. With its much improved navy, China sees precious oil within reach, so it simply shoves Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei out of the way. No profit sharing agreement here. Everything will go to the new boss, same as the old boss, what East Asia has had to contend with for millennia.

If the American Empire can claim the Persian Gulf as a key territory to be defended and exploited, what’s stopping China from doing the same to the South China Sea? But this is not really about logics, only might. One does what one can get away with. America has also inserted itself into the South China Sea fracas, and has even conducted joint military exercises with its former enemies, Vietnam and Cambodia, all to counter China.

Cambodia’s Prime Minister, Hun Sen, was groomed by the Vietnamese to be their ally, after an invasion to dislodge Pol Pot, who was backed by the Chinese. For smoking Pot, Vietnam was invaded by China in 1979, during a 28-day war that caused 6,000 Chinese deaths, with Vietnamese casualties unknown. (In 1995, locals in Sapa told me everyone just ran for the hills, and the Chinese simply destroyed everything in their paths, including the church in the middle of town, and bridges they had themselves built during the Vietnam War.) Sen, once dubbed “The One-Eyed Lackey of the Vietnamese,” then became friendlier towards the deeper-pocketed Chinese, and even allowed a Chinese navy ship to dock in Sihanoukville in late 2008. Now he’s getting chummy with the US, thus pissing off China, but not totally. A very corrupt man, Sen will hug anyone or anything if you shove enough bills into his pocket, but these strange maneuvers are also not untypical of the complicated flirtation, hedging and whoring of many small countries. To survive, they must latch on to various patrons, even those who have screwed them royally not long ago.

Which brings us to Vietnam. For the last month or so, the Vietnamese blogosphere has been howling over a leaked tape by one Colonel Tran Dang Thanh, of a rambling speech he gave to Hanoi’s university professors. In it, Thanh revealed Vietnam’s stance towards Russia, Iran, North Korea and, most interestingly, China and the United States.

Thanh praised Iran and North Korea, “someone we must emulate,” for standing up to a super power, the US, but went at extreme length to explain why Vietnam must yield to China, whom he waxed poetically as “a friend whose mountain joins our mountain, whose river joins our river, who shares with us the East Sea, a mutual friendship,” then added this joke as coda, “though our hands may shake, our legs still kick furiously,” prompting chuckles from his audience. The bottom line, though, is that Vietnam can’t go to war against China because it will get its ass kicked. China is simply too big, Thanh said, stating the obvious. As for leaning on the US, Thanh declared that America is simply an unreliable ally, that it will only use Vietnam as a pawn against China. Further, “They have never been truly good towards us [!], their crimes the heavens won’t forgive, and the earth won’t pardon.” Evoking Vietnam’s struggle against the West, Thanh reminded his audience of China’s contributions, “During our four-year fight against the French, our 21-year fight against the Americans, the people and government of China had sacrificed their rice and torn from their own shirts to give us each grain of rice, each gun, each pair of sandals so that we could be victorious against the French and Americans.” Thanh did admit that China has invaded Vietnam about twenty times altogether, and is encroaching now, but still, it is a neighbor, a huge and permanent nuisance that Vietnam must forever deal with, and it would be foolish to expect help from America, a distant pseudo friend that not so long ago tried to bomb Vietnam back to the Stone Age.

Soon enough, though, we’ll see Chinese oil rigs erected off Vietnamese coastline. Humiliated by China, and pressured by domestic disgust at governmental, or rather, national impotence, Vietnam may just turn to the US to help it deal with its recurrent foe.

Such is the fate of a small country. To be born small is to have a handicap one must live with. Collectively, Americans are spared from this condition, hence our swagger, although individually, we can feel pee wee enough, especially as we are jettisoned, individually, from all collective aims that make any sense. Our economy is illusory, our government puffed up by slogans and lies, and there’s no national agenda beyond boundless corruption and endless war, against much of the world, and even ourselves.




.

10 comments:

Strelnikov said...

Vietnam War II: Fuck You, Chairman Mao!

Anonymous said...

AND the Umbrellaphant Man and BS (Buffalo Soldier-in-chief), BarBarack Zer0bama!

Strelnikov said...

I will say this: China doesn't have a large blue water navy, a navy that can fight in the vast expanse of the Pacific. Yet. They've already been suckered into buying an old Soviet aircraft carrier and they are refitting it, but America has 11 carrier battle groups (a carrier or two, plus the defensive ships and submarines.)

Personally I see the carrier as an obsolete weapon now that we have cruise missiles with miniaturized nukes and diesel subs that are extremely quiet, but the USN jet boys love the idea of a giant floating island to land their planes on. The next Pearl Harbor will a limited nuclear strike, just watch.

The Chinese can terrorize Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, Japan, even Australia, it's just that a few of those states have the US and its 11 carrier groups as backup. China cannot control the sea, and the US is stupid to invade China.

Craig said...

World War III over a bunch of fucking uninhabited islands no less.

Japan did no favors by nationalizing the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands. The powerful actors in Toyko have a more right-wing tilt and they are drawing a line around the islands in dispute--almost daring China to make a provocative move.

Beijing is in a fighting mood now. Nothing will give the Chinese Communist Party a more popular opinion boost than having the People's Liberation Navy blast a few "Jap" Coast Guard boats out of the water.

The problem for China is that an attack on the Japanese Self-Defense Forces or on sovereign Japanese territory is considered a hostile attack on the United States itself. Something that I am sure the military leadership in Beijing is well aware of.

Hopefully, some political leaders with an ounce of sanity in Beijing and Tokyo can turn the temperature down over a bunch of rocks in the middle of the ocean.

As for Vietnam...don't ever fuck with The Viets. The French learned this lesson. The Americans learned this lesson. And the Chinese learned this lesson several times. However, the Chinese keep trying to invade Vietnam every so few hundred years apart; China may have never learned the lesson after all.

The last conflict between China and Vietnam in 1979 resulted in 400,000 PLA troops running back across the border with tails between their legs. The out-gunned and out-numbered Vietnamese just plain whooped their ass. Even more incredible, the Vietnamese were kicking the Khmer Rouge out of Cambodia at the same time.

Vietnam does not need America for protection; they can manage China by itself, thank you very much.

Anonymous said...

See the Time's magazine for the Walking Dead of 1979 war. Linh Dinh, would you please be neutral on the facts, 60,000 PLA never came home for the cause of their crazy slave owners, not 6,000. Long before I heard you cried about Obama, that was what made me sad deeply. It's like a poor man bowing on the rich and condemned the one has his side on the poor.

Then again, are you rich?

Anonymous said...

Then again, there is no territorial defenders like North Vietnamese in this world. It's proven since the pre-historical time of Viet Nam. I feel like it's better dying on a battle field against those chinese invaders than living under their slavery or worse seeing my country under chinese slavery.

Those paper tigers need only this moment to boost up their images to the world and to their people at the same time and consume whatever resources available to themselves. They also know really well what will happen to themselves if the war happens regardless who will win.

Linh Dinh said...

Hi all,

The 6,000 Chinese deaths I cited is in fact incorrect, but it was an honest mistake, with no hidden agenda behind it. I stated Vietnamese losses as unknown, so I was not trying to compare Chinese with Vietnamese deaths, to prove who won or lost.

I just checked on Wikipedia and saw that the Chinese claimed they lost nearly 7,000, but this figure is dismissed as too low by just about everyone, with 26,000 deaths a more reasonable estimate.





Tran said...

verry good

Nhat Ban said...

The 6,000 Chinese deaths I cited is in fact incorrect, but it was an honest mistake, with no hidden agenda behind it. I stated Vietnamese losses as unknown, so I was not trying to compare Chinese with Vietnamese deaths, to prove who won or lost.

I just checked on Wikipedia and saw that the Chinese claimed they lost nearly 7,000, but this figure is dismissed as too low by just about everyone, with 26,000 deaths a more reasonable estimate.

Japan said...

Very good ..

Followers

About Me

Born in Vietnam in 1963, I came to the US in 1975, and have also lived in Italy and England. I'm the author of two books of stories, Fake House (2000) and Blood and Soap (2004), five of poems, All Around What Empties Out (2003), American Tatts (2005), Borderless Bodies (2006), Jam Alerts (2007) and Some Kind of Cheese Orgy (2009), and a novel, Love Like Hate (2010). I've been anthologized in Best American Poetry 2000, 2004, 2007, Great American Prose Poems from Poe to the Present, Postmodern American Poetry: a Norton Anthology (vol. 2) and Hopeless: Barack Obama and the Politics of Illusion, among other places. I'm also editor of Night, Again: Contemporary Fiction from Vietnam (1996) and The Deluge: New Vietnamese Poetry (2013), and translator of Night, Fish and Charlie Parker, the poetry of Phan Nhien Hao (2006). Blood and Soap was chosen by Village Voice as one of the best books of 2004. My writing has been translated into Italian, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Portuguese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic, Icelandic and Finnish, and I've been invited to read in London, Cambridge, Brighton, Paris, Berlin, Reykjavik, Toronto and all over the US. I've also published widely in Vietnamese.